“Don’t let the striking students stand alone”
An appeal from and views of a group of teachers and staff at tertiary educationinstitutes

(in Chinese)

The August 31st decision by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress on Hong Kong’s Chief Executive election stated that the threshold for nomination would be the support of “more than half of Nominating Committee members”, that the number of candidates be limited to two or three, and that the composition of the Nominating Committee be based on the four sectors of the Election Committee. As teachers and as citizens, we are pained and outraged to see the advancement of democracy in Hong Kong stifled and suppressed. Even though it is unlikely that democratic universal suffrage can be realized in the short term, we absolutely must not give up. During these dark days, we must resolutely guard our stations and stand together to shoulder the responsibility of our time.

A new round of protests in the form of class boycotts is currently being discussed and planned in the education sector. When we look back at history, both in China and overseas, we see that student movements have been an important force in pushing for social progress. Our hope in Hong Kong’s future lies in the passion and spirit shown by our young people and their willingness to take up the mantle in the fight for democracy and social justice.

Yet, while the students are pure of heart, they have recently become subject to unreasonable smears and attacks. We appeal to all sectors of society, and particularly to our colleagues in the education field, to cherish the innocent hearts of the students – do not let them stand alone to face the white terror, give them our staunchest support and protection. During the class boycott action, every student should have freedom from fear.

Here follows some specific suggestions for consideration by colleagues:

  1. As citizens of society, tertiary students have the freedom ofassociation and expression; they have the right to express their opinions onpolitical issues and teachers should respect this. Student movements provide great opportunities for civic education. We suggest that teachers discuss issues with students in an interactive way and in an atmosphere of mutual respect; encourage students to care about society and to make independent and rational judgments.
  2. As class boycotts may affect day-to-day teaching, we call on teachers to be understanding of students’ difficulties. While upholding educational principles, we hope teachers can be lenient in dealing with student absences arising from class boycotts. We also suggest that teachers should, as much as possible, avoid setting any important tests or assignments during the period of the class boycott.
  3. We urge teachers to do as much as they can to allow striking students to catch up with their studies. For example, they could provide make-up classes, offer guidance and classroom audio/visual recordings to help students complete their academic requirements smoothly.
  4. Colleagues in the education sector and other sectors of society can show their support to the striking students during the period of the class boycott by wearing yellow ribbons.

>> Initiators & Initiating Organisations

Initiators

  1. Ivan Choy Chi-keung, Senior Lecturer, Department of Government and Public Administration, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  2. Wilfred Wong Wai-ho, Associate Professor, Department of Government and Public Administration, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  3. Fung Ho-lap, Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  4. Wong Hung, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  5. Joseph Chan Man, Professor, School of Communication and Journalism, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  6. Dora Choi Po-king, Associate Professor, Department of Educational Administration & Policy, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  7. Raymond Yep Kin-man, Professor, Department of Public Policy, City University of Hong Kong
  8. Cheung Chor-yung, Senior Teaching Fellow, Department of Public Policy, City University of Hong Kong
  9. Fung Wai-wah, Senior Lecturer, City University of Hong Kong SCOPE
  10. Sing Ming, Associate Professor, Division of Social Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  11. Joseph Cho Wai Chan, Professor, Politics and Public Administration, The University of Hong Kong
  12. CHAN Ka-lok, Associate Professor, Department of Government and International Studies, Hong Kong Baptist University
  13. Chris CHAN King-chi, Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Social Studies, City University of Hong Kong
  14. CHEN Yun-chung, Associate Professor, Department of Cultural Studies, Lingnan University
  15. Chung Kim-wah, Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Social Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  16. Brian Fong Chi-hang, Assistant Professor, Department of Asian & Policy Studies, The Hong Kong Institute of Education
  17. Petula HO Sik-ying, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work and Social Administration, The University of Hong Kong
  18. Kung Lap-yan, Associate Professor, Department of Cultural & Religious Studies, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  19. Leung Yan-wing, Associate Professor, Department of Education Policy & Leadership, Hong Kong Institute of Education
  20. Leung Yuk-ming, Associate Prefessor, Department of Cultural Studies, Lingnan University
  21. LUK Kit-ling, Lecturer, Division of Communication & Social Sciences, Hong Kong Community College, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  22. Alvin So, Chair Professor, Division of Social Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  23. Mirana May Szeto, Assistant Professor, Department of Comparative Literature, University of Hong Kong
  24. TO Yiu-ming, Assistant Professor, Department of Journalism, Hong Kong Baptist University
  25. TSING Nam-Kiu, Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics, The University of Hong Kong
  26. WONG Wai-kwok Benson, Assistant Professor, Department of Government and International Studies, Hong Kong Baptist University
  27. Joe Cho-ki YAU, Lecturer, Department of Computer Science, Hong Kong Baptist University
  28. Chan S. C., Senior Lecturer, Department of Religion and Philosophy, Hong Kong Baptist University
  29. Chiang Yik-man: Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  30. Ho Chi-kwan, Retired Associate Professor, Department of Applied Social Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
  31. Chong Yiu Kwong, Senior Teaching Fellow, Department of Education Policy and Leadership, Hong Kong Institute of Education

Initiating Organisations

  1. Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union
  2. Confederation of Tertiary Institutes Staff Union
  3. Chinese University Employees General Union
  4. City University of Hong Kong Staff Association
  5. Hong Kong Baptist University Faculty and Staff Union
  6. Staff Association of The Hong Kong Institute of Education
  7. Vocational Training Council Employees Genera Association
  8. Vocational Training Council Academic Staff Association
  9. Academic Staff Association of the Hong Kong Institute of Education